15
Aug
17

GARGLING AND GURGLING WITH WINE, NOT LISTERINE Many years ago, during my early days as a wine writer and educator, I was invited to innumerable wine tastings both here and abroad. An invitation to visit Dom Ruinart, the remarkable producer of Champagne, ostensibly to help harvest grapes. Is as vivid in my mind today as it was long ago. On a gray morning In Reims, the heart of the French region that lends its proprietary name to its local sparkling wine, I was handed a sharp metal clipper and was ushered to a grapevine, the first in a long line that stretched for several yards. Serious vineyard works were already moving quickly along parallel vines of grapevines. I slowly approached one bunch of grapes, then another. At the third swipe at a sizable bunch of grapes, I missed the grape stem and accidentally took a slice out of my finger. Ouch! Blood ran like wine and I needed a large Band-Aid to cover the beau-beau, the French version of our boo-boo. The inexperienced American group failed to compete with experienced vineyard workers. It was a relief to know that after a few backbreaking attempts at contributing our share, we realized it was merely an exercise to show the difficulties of getting the harvest in. After we contributed a few bunches of grapes into baskets, we moved on to the next important stage, watching the berries de-stemmed and crushed. We joined the vineyard workers, many of them who arrived like migrating birds from as far away as Poland for every harvest. It is the custom to serve vineyard workers a hearty lunch. Our reward was to share in a bountiful feasted of pork and wurst stew and bottles of local red wine. Later we dined at one of the area’s best restaurants. Wine tasting by producers and wine writers is serious business. Small talk was limited as we sampled the variety of Dom Ruinart’s excellent house styles. The only sound was the buzz of appreciative mms and ahs counterpointed by a polite, discreet sound best described as a mix of gargling and gurgling. I needed to know the reason for all the mouth noises. “Why and how do you make that sound,” I asked naively. The more experienced writers looked at me as though I had fallen off the turnip truck. “First we inhale the wine’s aroma. Step two We swish the wine around the mouth to cover all areas of tongue and mouth,” was the answer. “Then you gently gargle a soupçon of wine.” Easier said than done. I lifted my glass, swished as directed, and attempted the gargle. Champagne bubbles caught at the back of my throat, and I choked, spewing a mouthful of bubbly across the table. So much for sophistication. I learned to gargle discretely. But I never fail to explain why wine is swirled in the glass (to aerate it, of course. Except for champagne because we pay extra for bubbles and a gurgle dissipates them. The technique is a boon to give a hint of what the wine offers. I tell new wine drinkers they will develop the habit of swirling every glass of liquid they drink, including their morning orange juice.

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0 Responses to “GARGLING AND GURGLING WITH WINE, NOT LISTERINE Many years ago, during my early days as a wine writer and educator, I was invited to innumerable wine tastings both here and abroad. An invitation to visit Dom Ruinart, the remarkable producer of Champagne, ostensibly to help harvest grapes. Is as vivid in my mind today as it was long ago. On a gray morning In Reims, the heart of the French region that lends its proprietary name to its local sparkling wine, I was handed a sharp metal clipper and was ushered to a grapevine, the first in a long line that stretched for several yards. Serious vineyard works were already moving quickly along parallel vines of grapevines. I slowly approached one bunch of grapes, then another. At the third swipe at a sizable bunch of grapes, I missed the grape stem and accidentally took a slice out of my finger. Ouch! Blood ran like wine and I needed a large Band-Aid to cover the beau-beau, the French version of our boo-boo. The inexperienced American group failed to compete with experienced vineyard workers. It was a relief to know that after a few backbreaking attempts at contributing our share, we realized it was merely an exercise to show the difficulties of getting the harvest in. After we contributed a few bunches of grapes into baskets, we moved on to the next important stage, watching the berries de-stemmed and crushed. We joined the vineyard workers, many of them who arrived like migrating birds from as far away as Poland for every harvest. It is the custom to serve vineyard workers a hearty lunch. Our reward was to share in a bountiful feasted of pork and wurst stew and bottles of local red wine. Later we dined at one of the area’s best restaurants. Wine tasting by producers and wine writers is serious business. Small talk was limited as we sampled the variety of Dom Ruinart’s excellent house styles. The only sound was the buzz of appreciative mms and ahs counterpointed by a polite, discreet sound best described as a mix of gargling and gurgling. I needed to know the reason for all the mouth noises. “Why and how do you make that sound,” I asked naively. The more experienced writers looked at me as though I had fallen off the turnip truck. “First we inhale the wine’s aroma. Step two We swish the wine around the mouth to cover all areas of tongue and mouth,” was the answer. “Then you gently gargle a soupçon of wine.” Easier said than done. I lifted my glass, swished as directed, and attempted the gargle. Champagne bubbles caught at the back of my throat, and I choked, spewing a mouthful of bubbly across the table. So much for sophistication. I learned to gargle discretely. But I never fail to explain why wine is swirled in the glass (to aerate it, of course. Except for champagne because we pay extra for bubbles and a gurgle dissipates them. The technique is a boon to give a hint of what the wine offers. I tell new wine drinkers they will develop the habit of swirling every glass of liquid they drink, including their morning orange juice.”



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